Though Trump UsedWord That May Appear Violent, Why Have Security Does? Does This Make Him Strong or Makes Him to Appear as a Coward?

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I would agree all have the right to protest peacefully, but when there is a double standard. I have questions. Violence is not the answer, but when you use language that appears to be violent.That is a problem. Now, Trump says he is a Christian, whatever happened to “Love Your Neighbor.” For that reason, I pose the question. Do not talk tough, and hide because appearance may reveal your true identity?
In foreboding dialogue around the political world this past year, a bipartisan chorus warned that this 2016 presidential campaign was teetering on violence.
The anger from the two sides was so raw; they concluded — from supporters of Donald J. Trump terrified they are losing their country and from protesters who fear the man is leading America down a dark road of hate — that your dreaded moment was commencing to look inevitable. “I don’t see where that anger goes,” the historian Heather Cox Richardson noted some time ago, “except into violence.”
This weekend it finally arrived.
The ugly and disordered clashes that unfolded on Friday inside a tense Chicago arena between Trump supporters plus a coalition of protesters were the culmination of an extraordinarily indignant year in the community life in which those on the two parties in a widening divide right now see their fellow Americans as being fundamental threat to their economic future and essential dignity.
By Saturday, it was evident which the past two days were something of a turning point in the presidential race. Demonstrations at Trump rallies persisted, causing a panicked moment close to Dayton, Ohio when Secret Service agents briefly encircled the candidate when a man leaped over the security barrier and rushed toward the stage. Outside his nighttime rally in Kansas City Missouri, police used pepper spray during standoffs with crowds.
And Mr. Trump’s rivals in each of the parties denounced his candidacy as the match that lit the heart when they struggle to harness the same electoral forces which may have turned him into your Republican front-runner. “Donald Trump has developed a toxic environment,” Gov. John Kasich of Ohio declared. “There isn’t a place for a national leader to take advantage of the fears of persons.”
Senator Marco Rubio, keeping his political life in Florida’s primary on Tuesday, likened Mr. Trump to some third-world strongman. Hillary Clinton blamed Mr. Trump of committing “political arson,” telling you “the ugly, divisive rhetoric we’re receiving news from Donald Trump plus the encouragement of violence and aggression would be wrong, and it’s dangerous.”
Deep in a campus pavilion at the University of Illinois at Chicago on Friday, a hard night of pushing, shoving, sign-ripping and screaming left three people injured, the police officers said, and, at least, four were arrested. Mr. Trump canceled the gathering for safety reasons, and on Saturday, sounding annoyed, he referred to as demonstrators “a disgrace if you want to know the truth,” suggesting the new comment was an organized and careful protest with “professionally” made signs. (Activist groups did try to disrupt the function though many protesters said that they learned of these demonstrations on social websites and went dedicated to them accord.)

Reference

“Donald Trump’s Heated Words Were Destined to Stir Violence …” Insert Name of Site in Italics. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Mar. 2016 <http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/13/us/politics/donald-trumps-heated-words-were-de&gt;

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